Alzheimer’s disease is the most frequently diagnosed cause of dementia, but it is not the only cause. The tips below will teach you about your aging brain and current approaches to treatment. Unfortunately, treatments will not reverse or stop the advancement of dementia, but they can help to slow the progress.

The aging human body brings on physical and cognitive changes that are a normal part of the aging process. Many older individuals will notice that they experience differences in their ability to learn new things, retain information or even recall simple thoughts or words. If these annoying memory lapses do not interfere with your daily lifestyle, it is rarely a cause for concern.

If you are experiencing memory loss or cognitive impairment that interferes with your life, you probably should see a healthcare professional. Cognitive changes, such as frequently forgetting to bathe or eat, warrant a consultation. These symptoms are collectively called dementia and health care professionals will attempt to discover what is causing your symptoms.

Labeling your symptoms will often dictate treatment. Alzheimer’s is a specific diagnosis of a type of dementia. A physical examination that includes various tests will help healthcare professionals diagnose the reasons you are experiencing these symptoms. The causes can vary and could include other diseases, medications, vitamin deficiencies and even dehydration.

If your condition is labeled Alzheimer’s you will likely be prescribed medication, whereas mild symptoms of dementia will often be treated differently. Treatment to alleviate the symptoms of dementia not considered Alzheimer’s or from another specifically identified cause will often include suggestions for lifestyle changes.

Exercise is considered important in the treatment of symptoms of dementia associated with natural aging and Alzheimer’s. Research is ongoing and there are few thorough explanations for the reasons that exercise seems to help prevent and improve symptoms of dementia. However, the evidence is strong enough so that medical professionals everywhere suggest an exercise for older patients including those with Alzheimer’s.

Cognitive exercises such as puzzles and games are often used to help treat the symptoms of dementia and early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. There is ongoing research about the benefits of different cognitive exercises in effectively treating these diseases. Although none of these studies has arrived at a conclusive answer, there is no downside to engaging in such activities. There is the possible upside that they will help improve your ability to live with Alzheimer’s or age-related dementia by reducing the symptoms of forgetfulness for at least some period.

Make efforts to remain active and engaged in your lifestyle even after you begin seeing symptoms of dementia. You may need a companion or other healthcare professional to help you maintain your lifestyle, but there is evidence that working to stay active and healthy does help slow down the onset of age-related dementia symptoms.

Cognitive changes associated with aging can often be helped by adhering to a healthy lifestyle. Use the tips above to adapt to your aging brain even if you receive an Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis.